Thursday 1 July 2010 

World Cup To Feature DRS, England Gets Trophy Event

World Cup To Feature DRS, England Gets Trophy Event
World Cup To Feature DRS, England Gets Trophy Event
© REUTERS/Vivek Prakash (SINGAPORE - Tags: SPORT CRICKET) Picture Supplied by Action Images
 

Following the conclusion of the International Cricket Council's (ICC) Executive Board meeting in Singapore, the Decision Review System is likely to be implemented for the 2011 World Cup and the 2013 Champions Trophy will be played in England.

Those were two of a number of decisions made by the board, which met ahead of the ICC Annual Conference.

The Decision Review System (DRS) allows teams to challenge an umpire's onfield decision until they make two incorrect challenges, whereupon their opportunity to challenge is removed. Currently, it is only used in Test match cricket, but the Executive Board recommends that the DRS should continue to be used in Tests if the home side decides it wishes to implement the system.

Furthermore, provided that broadcasters and the host members can come to agreement and the technology is available, the system will be implemented in One-Day International cricket for the first time during the 2011 World Cup in Bangladesh, India and Sri Lanka.

“The detailed work of the ICC Cricket Committee gave both the CEC and the ICC Board excellent direction and there was full agreement that technology would be used whenever possible," ICC CEO Haroon Lorgat commented.

“We have all seen the benefits of using DRS to assist umpires in Test cricket and we are now keen to use DRS in the ICC Cricket World Cup. We also acknowledge and we are grateful for the support provided by broadcasters and technology suppliers around the world during the development phase of DRS.”

There was also discussion on the Future Tours Programme between 2012 and 2020 and suggestions regarding the frequency of global events, qualification for global events and the possibility of ODI and Test leagues. A working group will meet with an ICC Governance Committee before a firm proposal is tabled at the ICC Chief Executives' Committee Meeting in September.

Lorgat added: “Although we have made good progress, this exercise requires more work. We know there are exciting opportunities to protect and promote all three formats but we must exercise patience as we consider all aspects in introducing context and content in international cricket.

“There is clearly an appetite from all quarters to examine the make-up of the ICC Cricket World Cup and the ICC World Twenty20 and seek the best balance between excellence and development. In terms of the number of participating teams, it is possible that the World Cup could be reduced and the World Twenty20 expanded.”

The board also confirmed that the 2013 Champions Trophy would be held in England - nine years after it last hosted the event in 2004, meaning that the venues for major international tournaments until 2015 are as follows:

ICC Cricket World Cup 2011 – Bangladesh, India and Sri Lanka
ICC World Twenty20 2012 – Sri Lanka
ICC Champions Trophy 2013 – England and Wales
ICC Women’s World Cup 2013 – India
ICC World Twenty20 2014 – Bangladesh
ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 – Australia and New Zealand

The ICC Board also approved revised rules, with amendments, to be agreed relating to the "whereabouts" provision of the ICC Anti-Doping code, which will come into effect on 1st August.

“I am satisfied that we have now resolved the long outstanding issue of filing whereabouts information and the contribution of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) in finding a solution needs to be acknowledged. This is a complex area for players and administrators," Lorgat said.

The board agreed to recommend that Seychelles should become the 105th member of the ICC and along with the England & Wales Cricket Board (ECB) absolved Australian umpire Daryl Harper of any blame during the Wanderers Test match between England and South Africa, when a technology failure prevented the DRS from working properly.

© Cricket World 2010