Paul Farbrace credits Andrew Strauss for change in ODI fortunes

Paul Farbrace credits Andrew Strauss for change in ODI fortunes
England assistant coach, Paul Farbrace, credited director of England cricket, Andrew Strauss, for the change in fortunes of England's One-Day International side.
©REUTERS / Action Images
 

England assistant coach, Paul Farbrace, credited director of England cricket, Andrew Strauss, for the change in fortunes of England's One-Day International side.

After what was a disastrous 2015 World Cup for England, Strauss was appointed the director of cricket, with the responsibility to develop the long term strategy of the team.

Strauss began his tenure by putting emphasis on change in the attitude of the players, a move that has paid rich dividends over the course of the summer.

England started their turnaround by playing an extremely attractive brand of cricket to win the ODI series against New Zealand in June this year.

Farbrace was the coach incharge during the New Zealand series earlier this year, after which Trevor Bayliss took over as the full-time coach of England from the 2015 Ashes campaign.

The 48-year-old revealed that it was Strauss, who urged England to approach both the Test and ODI formats with the same level of intensity.

“Straussy has made it very clear that one-day cricket is as important as Test cricket.

“He said that right from the start.

“He likes the idea of having a clear line between Test and one-day cricket and having a bigger squad of players.” 

Farbrace also stated that there has been an intentional effort by the team management to build the Test and the ODI squads around a specialised set of players.

“When a Test match finishes, players aren’t just thinking about changing the ball and the colour of the kit.

“We’ve actually got people coming into the one-day squad who are desperate to do well.

“What will happen is that some people will come into one-day cricket and do really well and might get themselves into the Test side.

“But we’re not using one-day cricket as a vehicle for Test cricket.

“One-day cricket is being treated in isolation to Test cricket.” 

England are currently level at 2-2 after coming back spectacularly from defeats in the first two matches of the ongoing ODI series against Australia.

Having witnessed England's remarkable turnaround over the summer, Farbrace admitted that he did not expect such outstanding results.

“If at the start of this summer somebody would have said that we would draw the New Zealand Tests, beat New Zealand in the one-dayers, win the Ashes and be going into the last game locked at 2-2 heading to Old Trafford; we would have snapped their hand off and walked away saying ‘whatever they’re drinking, I’ll have a pint of that’.”

Farbrace commended Morgan for leading the team from the front to instil belief in the players that the positive approach to the game really works.

“The one thing Morgs (Morgan) has done – and he did it again at Headingley – is that he goes out and plays in the way he asks the team to play.

“It’s all very well saying we want to attack and play positively but when he goes out and does it others think: ‘Crikey, it really is OK to play that way.’

“So not only does he speak well but he leads well in the way he plays the game.” 

The series-deciding fifth ODI of the ongoing series will be played at Old Trafford on Sunday, with both teams vying to end their campaigns on a high. 

© Cricket World 2015