Geoffrey Boycott Knighted

Geoffrey Boycott
Geoffrey Boycott
©Action Images / Julian Herbert Livepic
 

The Yorkshire County Cricket Club would like to extend its sincere congratulations to ‘Sir’ Geoffrey Boycott.

Boycott, 78, was awarded a knighthood in ex-Prime Minister Theresa May's resignation honours list. Every departing prime minister can draw up a resignation honours list, which the Cabinet Office has to approve.

He scored 8,114 runs in 108 Tests for England from 1964 to 1982 and was captain on four occasions in 1978 in place of the injured Mike Brearley. Over the course of a First-Class career that spanned 25 years, Boycott averaged 56.83 with the bat, scoring 151 centuries and over 48,000 runs. He became the first ever Englishman to twice average over 100 in a season and when he left the International scene in 1982, he had scored more Test runs than anyone else.

 

Boycott, who memorably scored his 100th first-class hundred before his ‘Yorkshire public’ in 1977 said: “I’m absolutely delighted, honoured and thrilled to bits and I’d like to say thank you to Theresa May and all the people who have helped and supported me throughout my career.”

Yorkshire president, Geoff Cope, said: “Sir Geoffrey has had an absolutely wonderful career for Yorkshire and England. Nobody will forget his 100th hundred at Headingley. That day, Yorkshire felt for him and his outstanding achievement.

“His achievement in the game of cricket is outstanding and he thoroughly deserves the honour that has been bestowed upon him.

“I don’t think you ever set out to get a knighthood, you set off in the first instance to do a good job, you’re paid to do something you love and clearly Geoffrey was one who performed.

“Everyone at the Club, including myself, are delighted that Geoffrey has been rewarded for his efforts throughout his cricketing career. I’ve said all along he’s the best manmade player that I’ve ever seen. He’s one of the best natural talents around. Geoffrey made himself into the player that he was. He practiced hours after everybody else had finished, he went to schools and local clubs to get people to bowl at him, and he just batted on and on. He gave an awful lot to improve to the level of talent he ended up with.”