We Can Take 10 Wickets Tomorrow - Warner

David Warner
David Warner is confident Australia will take the 10 wickets they need to beat India in Adelaide
©REUTERS / Action Images
 

Any Adelaide Test always comes alive on the last two days. It was the same story with the ongoing Australia versus India match as things got heated in the middle.

David Warner struck his second hundred of the match joining an elite club of batsmen who have done it twice in the same calendar year. Australia now lead by 363 runs after finishing day two on 290 for five with a lead of 363 runs, after bowling out India for 444 in their first innings.

But before Warner scored 102 runs, he had an exchange with Indian fast bowler Varun Aaron after being bowled off a no ball when on 66. Shane Watson, Shikhar Dhawan and Indian skipper Virat Kohli also got involved. Later there was another such incident between Rohit Sharma and Steve Smith, and on both occasions, the umpires had to intervene.

"The temperature in the middle got up to 40-degree-plus, so maybe it got to some people. It happens in cricket when decisions don’t go your way and you get bowled off a no-ball. They will come at you. Sometimes you give it back, sometimes you take it silently," said Warner.

"It is just how cricket is played. When things don’t go your way, you get full of adrenaline. Aaron bowling that no ball and nearly getting me out, he came at me. And I had a go at him too.

"Everyone knows I like to get involved and get verbal. But maybe I shouldn’t have done that. It was a bit of a contest and it is like a roller-coaster ride. You just ride it," he added.

This was in sharp contrast to how the Australian team had reacted on day three when Kohli had got hit on this helmet by a Mitchell Johnson bouncer. All players had rushed to check on the batsman.

"Given the incidents of the last week and a half, it is quite tough when someone gets hit in the head.

"You sit back and hope he is okay. We play cricket in the spirit of the game. But when we play tough, we play tough.

"That’s only verbal though. But when someone gets hurt, you have to give him sympathy," Warner said.

Meanwhile, Indian batsman Ajinkya Rahane brushed off the incident as part of cricket.

"It was competitive in the middle. It is always competitive between India and Australia and this is something good for cricket.

"What happened on the field is part and parcel of the game, but not part of the game. I felt both the umpires handled it really well. Things like these always happen in cricket," Rahane said.

Talking about the game, Warner felt that Australia have a big chance on a wearing pitch on the final day.

"At the moment it’s hard to score when the ball gets older," he said. "But there is a nice rough area for Nathan Lyon to exploit tomorrow. We saw that in first innings he pretty much hit it with every delivery.

"Tomorrow, we will try to take wickets with the new ball and once it gets older, we will try and use the conditions to reverse the ball."

Lyon took five for 134 in the Indian first innings. "We have seen how much he has evolved in the last couple years. Now he has a five-fer in the first innings of a home Test.

"There is no reason why he can’t come out tomorrow with his tail up and help us take ten wickets. The pitch has changed and there are nearly 98 overs, there will be at least 10 chances for us to do that," Warner said.

India will have a whole day to bat tomorrow to either save the game or go for an improbable win. The latter will be a tougher proposition considering that Lyon got so much out of the pitch in the first innings.

"Nathan Lyon is an experienced bowler and he bowled really well," Rahane said.

"That was an unplayable delivery but it happened and that’s past now," said the batsman referring to his first-innings dismissal.

"We just have to focus in the present. We have to apply our minds and if we do that I am sure we will do well tomorrow," Rahane signed off.

© Cricket World 2014